Friday, May 22, 2009

19. Knitted Lace (Wide)

"Knitted Lace (Wide)" is aptly named. It is over twice as wide as its nearest challenger among the edgings we have seen to date. I have knit all of the samples with the same fingering weight cotton on 2.25mm needles. Each of the other edgings has fallen into one of three groups: just under 1", 1¼"-1½" and 2"-2½". By comparison, Knitted Lace (Wide) comes in at a whopping 5¾"!

The design has two rows of faggoting alternating with two rows of single eyelets along the upper edge, and garter stitch triangles separated by multiple diagonal rows of eyelets running down into the saw-tooth lower edge. The stitch count steadily rises from 31 to 47 before the added stitches are bound off in the final row of the 34-row repeat. The bind-off is achieved by knitting two stitches together, replacing the stitch on the left needle and repeating the process until only the original 31 stitches remain.



You can download the full-size chart, verbal instructions and notes here.

I absolutely love the selvage created in this pattern. I have always slipped the first stitch of every row, thinking that the best option for a neat selvage. But here you knit to the last stitch of each row and bring the yarn forward before slipping it. The result resembles a line of knit stitches running up the side of the piece, not unlike a bound-off edge.


So exquisitely even, definitely a technique after this perfectionist's heart! I can see that this method will loom large in my future for any project not knit in the round.

Like Making Knitted Edging and Another Pretty Pattern before, this design was submitted by S.G.H. of Monmouth IL for publication in the newspaper.

Next week: Parisian Lace

10 comments:

yarnjourney said...

Thank you for another very pretty trim pattern. Also thanks for the selvage directions. I will have to try it. I am having a hard time visualizing the 'bring yarn forward' before slipping the stitch off the needle. I have never done or seen that mentioned before.

Coni Sims said...

Do you slip the last stitch purlwise or knit wise after bringing yarn forward?

Christinly said...

@Coni Sims-
You slip it purlwise. I tried it out this weekend. It works beautifully!

wes_ben said...

will the slip selvage result in 1 st for 1 row edge or 1 st for 2 rows (like the "normal" slipped selvage?

wes_ben said...

oh and does this work the same way whether the last stitch is a purl or a knit as in a seed stitch (just bring yarn to the front and slip purl wise?

Angelique Prahalis said...

And do you knit or purl the first stitch on the row following the slip one purlwise wyif

Aideen said...

Can you do this in any knitting pattern?

vintagekathleen said...

I have worked this selvage in both stockingnet and seed stitch--- it doesn't matter what kind of stitch precedes the last stitch as long as you slip the last stitch with the yarn forward and knit it when you turn the work.

Hanne Pjedsted said...

So noce. And if You slip the last 2 stitches af purl with yarn in front , You will have a nice selvedge on both sides. Try! Danish Knitter Hanne. Www.designstrik.dk

saxbabe said...

Does this work better than slipping the first stitch? I'm knitting something that has 14 rows of 2x2 rib, followed by a 4 row pattern, k4,p4 repeat to end for rows 1&2, p4,k4 repeat to end for rows 3&4. The pattern says to slip the first stitch of every row, but gives no direction as to knitwise or purlwise nor what the last stitch should be. The first time I slipped however that row started and finished with the stitch by pattern, it resulted in purl bumps down one side once I started the main pattern :-/ I've started again only slipping the first stitch knitwise and always purling the last stitch. Oddly enough it looks beautiful on the rib section, but on one side where the main pattern starts it looks like the Vs of the chain switched direction?! IE >>>>>><<<<<<<
Any tips to make it look the best would be most helpful :-)